University Distinguished Teaching Award 2023

Since 1988, The New School has recognized outstanding teachers with the Distinguished Teaching Award. In 2014, the university established an Award for Outstanding Achievements in Social Justice Teaching to recognize members of the faculty who significantly advance social justice through their teaching and research. Listed below are individuals who have been recognized for their outstanding commitment to teaching.

2023 Distinguished University Teaching Awards

  • Anjali Khosla, Assistant Professor of Journalism and Design, Eugene Lang College
  • Kenneth Millington, Part-Time Assistant Professor, Parsons First Year, Parsons School of Design
  • Hussein Rashid, Part-Time Lecturer, Religious Studies, Eugene Lang College

From The New School

Hussin Rashid in academic regalia offer a benediction at the Fordham Law School graduation in 2019.

Video: Critical Conversations: Exploring the Shi’i tradition: Understanding the Continuity of Imamate

ITREB USA presents Critical Conversations: “Exploring the Shi’i tradition: Understanding the Continuity of Imamate”, where we explore the vision of the Imams’ guidance across the centuries on ethic of the spirit of inquiry and compassion, and sharing. This Critical Conversation features Dr. Hussein Rashid and is moderated by Dr. Naaila Hudani.

Event: Religion, Race, and Urban Space in NYC – Museum of the City of New York

1 December 2022, 6:30PM EST

Tickets

Curator Azra Dawood talks with Nathaniel Deutsch, Alyssa Maldonado-Estrada, and Hussein Rashid, three leading scholars of religion in New York City, about the intersections of the public and private, the political, secular and sacred.

This program accompanies our new exhibition, City of Faith:Religion, Activism and Urban Space (opening 11/18).

Poster for event Religion, Race, and Urban Space in NYC at the Museum of the City of New York. Poster includes four portrait photos of speakers and details on date and location of event.
Poster for event at Museum of the City of New York on religion and race.

Event: Critical Race Theory and Religion

Shoulder to Shoulder hosted a panel discussion featuring Harman Singh from The Sikh Coalition, Taneeza Islam from South Dakota Voices for Peace, and Hussein Rashid representing the Interfaith Center of New York to learn more about what CRT is and isn’t and what we can do to create communities where all people, regardless of their faith, culture, or background are treated fairly, respectfully, and with dignity.

 

Event: Addressing the anti-CRT Movement

Addressing the anti-CRT Movement

What is the anti-CRT (Critical Race Theory) movement and what does it have to do with faith communities? Is teaching about religious and racial diversity now banned?

Join Shoulder to Shoulder for a presentation and panel discussionfeaturing Harman Singh from The Sikh Coalition, Taneeza Islam from South Dakota Voices for Peace, and Hussein Rashid representing the Interfaith Center of New York on Thursday, September 22 at 1pm ET to learn more about what CRT is and isn’t and what we can do to create communities where all people, regardless of their faith, culture, or background are treated fairly, respectfully, and with dignity.

Critical Race Theory understands that experiences of racism are both individual and personal as well as political and social. Legal scholars, activists, and lawyers established this theory upon realizing that many of the advancements during the civil rights movement had come to a stop and that some gains were even being reversed. Anti-CRT activists spread disinformation about what is and is not being taught in schools to shut down any conversation about our country’s racial and religious diversity, or the experiences of marginalized communities. The impact of the anti-CRT movement is that teachers and school officials are afraid to teach anything for fear it will be labeled divisive or CRT. Some school officials are receiving death threats and advocacy work to have the school calendar reflect the community’s religious and cultural diversity have been frozen.

The Sikh Coalition, South Dakota Voices for Peace, and the Interfaith Center of New York are among a broader community of organizations who have been working for years to improve teachers' access and ability to teach about our religious diversity, abiding by legal requirements and restrictions. Now they have run into significant and in some ways renewed energy with anti-CRT activists pushing for control over school curriculum. We will discuss how are they understanding the movement, strategizing engagement, and thinking creatively. We’ll also explore the roles of local educators, faith communities, and families in continuing to create more inclusive and diverse learning environments.

 

Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/addressing-the-anti-crt-movement-a-panel-discussion-tickets-411495864207

9.22 PC Social Post

More On That Now: A Spoleto Discussion Series | Spoleto Festival USA 2021

More On That Now: A Spoleto Discussion Series | Spoleto Festival USA 2021

The Crusades, 1000 years later 

Tuesday, January 18, 2022 

6:00pm ET 

REGISTER 

Registrants will receive an access link via email on the day of the discussion. 

Test your historical knowledge: Who “won” the holy wars? It may come as no surprise to hear there are varying perspectives on the Crusades’s causes and repercussions. By some accounts, nation-states and Islam emerged, while other accounts describe a region ravished and sectarian. Dating back over a millennium, these conflicts are a foundational example of how religion and ideology have been used throughout history to forcibly change societies. Taking inspiration from Unholy Wars—a new opera receiving its world premiere during Spoleto in 2022—panelists Ethel Sara Wolper (Professor, University of New Hampshire), Ussama Makdisi (Professor, Rice University), and Zeyba Rahman (Senior Program Officer for the Building Bridges Program, Doris Duke Foundation for Islamic Art) will discuss rare accounts of contemporary Muslim life as a result of this time period.

Spoleto’s ongoing discussion series returns with a new focus and expanded scope. More On That Now will cover a wide range of topics drawing inspiration from themes found in the upcoming 2022 Festival program and the broader artistic industry. Expert panelists will gather virtually and address the arts’ connection and intersection with religion, education, social justice, and identity politics. Dr. Hussein Rashid—an educator and academic whose research focuses on Muslim and American pop culture—will serve as the series-long moderator.

Spoleto Festival Panel: Beyond Omar

Beyond Omar
Tuesday, December 14, 2021
6:00pm ET

Register here: https://ticketing.spoletousa.org/5137/5139

The story of West African Muslims in the United States does not begin or end with Omar Ibn Said. While Said’s autobiography shares a remarkable first-hand account, the enslaved Muslim experience in America was not monolithic. During this talk, panelists Dr. Muhammad Fraser-Rahim (Professor, The Citadel) and Okolo Rashid (Co-Founder, President, and CEO, International Museum of Muslim Cultures) will discuss the lives and faith of several enslaved African Muslims, such as Ibrahima Abdur Rahman and Ayuba Suleiman Diallo—both princes in their homelands—and Salih Bilali and Bilali Mohammed, who worshipped along Georgia’s coastal islands. Discover these figures’ shared and disparate histories, cultural practices, and legacies left behind.

Spoleto’s ongoing discussion series returns with a new focus and expanded scope. More On That Now will cover a wide range of topics drawing inspiration from themes found in the upcoming 2022 Festival program and the broader artistic industry. Expert panelists will gather virtually and address the arts’ connection and intersection with religion, education, social justice, and identity politics. Dr. Hussein Rashid—an educator and academic whose research focuses on Muslim and American pop culture—will serve as the series-long moderator.